NAT Switch now built into Hyper-V! – Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

With the new Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, Microsoft finally added a built-in NAT Switch into Hyper-V! This gives Hyper-V Virtual Machines access to the computer’s network. The new switch automatically assigns IP address to your Virtual Machines, so no need to run your own DHCP server anymore!

In older versions of Windows 10, it was still required to create the Virtual Switch yourself, but this required static IP address assignment in the OS or the installation of a DHCP server. Not the most elegant option.

The switch is named “Default Switch” and cannot be changed in the Hyper-V Virtual Switch Manager:

The Default Switch Virtual Network in the Hyper-V Virtual Switch Manager
The Default Switch Virtual Network in the Hyper-V Virtual Switch Manager

According to the info message: “The Default Network switch automatically gives virtual machines access to the computer’s network using NAT (network address translation).”

I’m happy that Microsoft finally introduced this as it was already available in other 3rd Party solutions and a good argument why some people didn’t want to migrate to Hyper-V. Now they can! I wasn’t able to find an official statement of Microsoft on this new feature, but I’m sure it will be published soon.

What do you think of this new feature? Are you going to migrate from VMware or other solutions to Hyper-V? Let me know in the comments section!

Cheers,

Jean-Paul

Install the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update on your GPO-enabled machine

So your Group Policy (GPO) settings do not allow you to upgrade to the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update and you have local administrative access on your machine? The registry fix from below will change this! Copy the registry fix from below and save it as fix.reg with Notepad. (Make sure you don’t save it as fix.reg.txt!) Right click on the file and click “Merge”. You should now have access to Settings -> Update & Security -> Windows Insider Program. Enroll your device in the program (with your Microsoft account!) and select “Just fixes, apps and drivers” from the dropdown – which will enroll you in the Release Preview Ring. Go to Settings -> Update & Security -> Windows Updates and select “Check online for updates from Microsoft Update”. It will take some time before the Fall Creators Update pops up here.

When the Windows Insider Settings are greyed out again after several minutes, your GPO settings were re-applied and you need to rerun the fix.reg file. Run the fix.reg file every hour or so and check again for Windows Updates. After a couple of hours you should be able to enjoy the Fall Creators Update!

Registry Fix:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsSelfHost\Applicability]
"EnablePreviewBuilds"=dword:00000002
"IsBuildFlightingEnabled"=dword:00000001
"IsConfigExpFlightingEnabled"=dword:00000001
"IsConfigSettingsFlightingEnabled"=dword:00000001
"SuspensionStartTime"=-
"SuspensionEndTime"=-

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\PreviewBuilds]
"AllowBuildPreview"=dword:00000001
"EnableConfigFlighting"=dword:00000001

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\DataCollection]
"CommercialId"=-

Unknown Devices when installing Hyper-V on Windows 10

The following unknown device IDs will pop-up when you run the script or when you open Device Manager:

ROOT\VMBUS\0000
ROOT\VID\0000
ROOT\VPCIVSP\0000
ROOT\STORVSP\0000
ROOT\SYNTH3DVSP\0000

If you want to find all Unknown Devices, open PowerShell as an Administrator and run:

Get-WmiObject Win32_PNPEntity | Where-Object{$_.ConfigManagerErrorCode -ne 0} | Select DeviceID

On my work notebook, all drivers were correctly populated so it had to be something with my test laptop. It’s a fresh Windows 10 machine deployed by a Task Sequence – enabled with Device Guard and Credential Guard.

Solution:
During the installation I’ve installed the Microsoft-Hyper-V-Hypervisor feature on Windows 10. You also need to install the Microsoft-Hyper-V-Services if you want to have those drivers installed as well.

Lock screen image not showing – Windows 10 1703

Recently I was trying to apply a lock screen image with a GPO. I distributed the image to the C:/Windows/Web/Wallpaper directory and configured the Windows 10 GPO to that location. After running the Windows 10 Task Sequence successfully, the default lock screen image came up. I was using a large image from the client so that it still looks good on bigger screens. I’ve found out that after resizing the image back to 1080P, the image was applied successfully after locking the machine. Looks like a strange bug if you would ask me.

Cheers!

Windows Autopilot – Configure OneDrive from OOBE?!

Windows AutoPilot OneDriveRecently Microsoft introduced Windows Autopilot. This is a feature where you can register your corporate devices and where users can use their internet connection to sign in with their Azure AD credentials. The device is automatically enrolled with MDM like Intune and will receive apps and policies from there. According to Microsoft’s recent blog post and instruction video, a user needs to insert their WiFi password as the device will get the configuration from MDM and is already enrolled, without having the option to change the MDM provider or enroll the device as a personal device. The device really becomes a corporate-owned device. This looks a bit like the Apple Device Enrollment Program. One of the interesting parts of that instruction video, is that it looks like OneDrive can be pre-configured from OOBE as well:

WindowsAutoPilotOneDrive.PNG

I hope that Microsoft will further expand the possibilities of this service. What I would like to see is that the device can cache/download applications and settings from Intune during the factory imaging process. This ensures that applications, policies and settings are pre-loaded on a device and don’t need to be downloaded anymore. This will dramatically decrease network bandwidth and deployment time.

Hyper-V RemoteFX doesn’t work with Shielded VMs

Cause

Recently I replaced my workstation and that was a perfect time to rebuild my home lab. After I got green lights from my employer to install the all new Windows 10 Creators Update, I also installed Hyper-V and started to build servers in my lab. I was playing around with Shielding, Virtual TPM and SecureBoot until I found out that RemoteFX didn’t work anymore. I added the RemoteFX adapter to a VM with shielding enabled, but saw in the Hyper-V Settings menu that “0 virtual machines are currently using this GPU”. I first thought about updating my drivers, but I realized that I was playing around with some new features. After disabling Shielding for this VM, RemoteFX started to work!

Continue reading

PowerShell Function to Restart a Process

My notebook connects to a Docking Station with access to my receiver with speakerset, 2 screens, power and a KVM switch for my mouse and keyboard. When I lock my laptop, the sounds switches from the receiver to my internal speakers. When I unlock my laptop, the sound switches back but the Spotify application doesn’t play any sound. Closing the application doesn’t solve this problem, because the application will crash and I have to use the Task Manager to force the application to close. I made a PowerShell function that I’ve added to my PowerShell profile.

The Restart-Spotify function looks for any process that ends with “spotify” and stops the process. When all the processes are killed, a new instance of Spotify will be opened and the PowerShell console will close itself.

Even a reinstall of Spotify doesn’t help solving this issue I’m facing for months now. So the above script is a great workaround for me.